All posts tagged “literary blogs

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Mix Tape: Weapon of Mass Instruction

In this week’s Mix Tape on the Kenyon Review blog: “The Book That Can’t Wait” demands your immediate attention—because it was printed using disappearing ink; research shows that a busy coffee shop is a better location for tackling a creative project than a quiet library; a new… Read More

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Mix Tape: Rainbows Have Seams

In this week’s Mix Tape on the Kenyon Review blog: Do you like “suave V words, such as Svengali, svelte, bravura, verve” or “crunchy, brittle, crackly words, such as splinter, grapple, jostle, crusty”? Why do crayon names matter so much? What’s with Groupon’s literary style? And, wait, there’s more…

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Mix Tape: Judge a Book

In this week’s Mix Tape on the Kenyon Review blog: What are the top ten poetry presses based on their book covers? Where do things stand in publishing for writers of color, based on books reviewed by the New York Times? What does poetry have to… Read More

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Mix Tape: Live Forever

In this week’s Mix Tape on the Kenyon Review blog: remembering Ray Bradbury, who died this week at age 91; honoring Natasha Trethewey, the new PLOTUS; laughing at ourselves thanks to the fine writers at the Onion; and more.

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Mix Tape: Message in a Bottle

In this week’s Mix Tape on the Kenyon Review blog: What advice did Neil Gaiman give graduates at the commencement address everyone’s talking about? WWBBT (What Would Bob Barker Think) about the new Plinko Poetry game? How fast can you actually read? Check out these finds… Read More

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Mix Tape: Reinvention

In this week’s Mix Tape on the Kenyon Review blog: Marjorie Perloff, on how “well-crafted” poems are formulaic; Pentametron, a robotic Twitter account who turns tweets into metered poems; graphic designer Karen To, who revives “dead” words with creative typography; and more.

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Mix Tape: Only Human

In this week’s Mix Tape on the Kenyon Review blog: the dos and (mortifying) don’ts of author introductions (Chabon is not pronounced “Sha-BONE”); the $40,000 NEA grant USC will use to develop a Henry David Thoreau video game; Jonathan Franzen’s reflections on the suicide of… Read More